U. S. 7th Armored Division Association
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Latest News
  • See below for the latest "Hot News".
  • Click on the "7AD News" link above for 7AD-related news (other than Association news)
  • Click on the "Found in Europe" link above for 7AD-related items found in Europe

  • 68th Annual Reunion
    September 24-28, 2014
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Holiday Inn Inner Harbor
    NEWClick on lines above for reunion forms and information.NEW

    Click here for photographs of prior reunions.
    Click here for info on other military reunions.


    NEW Hot News NEW

    24 Feb - DNA Test Identifies MIA 3AD Soldier Whose Buddies Cadréd to 7AD - Click here for details
    24 Feb - Unknown Hamm X-46 Probably William F. Halloran (C/23) - Click here for details
    15 May - 48th Infantry Regiment Honors 7AD Distinguished Members - Click here for details

    Congressional Hearings and News Exposés
    on Scandals and Failures of US MIA Accounting

    The accounting for (recovery and identification of) remains of troops killed in prior conflicts was severely criticized in reports made public in June-July 2013. This led to the first of a series of House and Senate hearings. About 8,500 WWII Unknowns are buried in US military cemeteries, and almost nothing is being done nor is planned to be done to identify them, despite modern DNA technology and the vow of "No Man Left Behind".

    This issue came to light in July 2013 and soon expanded far beyond the original charges against these agencies. In fact, the information on this has become so extensive that it now requires its own web page. Click here for that web page.

    Memorials to 7AD Men in Four French Towns
    August 26-31, 2014

    The following memorials to 7AD men will be dedicated in ceremonies 26-31 Aug 2014. Watch here for more details. If you are a family member of one of these men, please contact Wesley Johnston. All of these men were killed in the liberation of these places.

  • Nangis - Earl D. Applegarth (CCB) [Already have memorial to John L. Wood (A/23) and William P. O'Rourke (Med/23)]
  • Maison Rouge - William R. Hall (A/23), Constantine E. Wasiak (A/23)
  • Vulaines-les-Provins - Donald L. Nazworth (A/434), Richard J. Egan (A/23), James P. Bost (A/23)
  • Provins - Clifford L. Gardner (HQ Co/31), Joseph A. Hergott (HQ Co/31), George H. Hein (A/31)

    Note that John L. Mordo (HQ Co/40) had originally been thought to have been killed at Provins. However later research indicates that he must have died at Bernay-Vilbert, France.

  • Moselle River Ceremonies
    November 8-17, 2014

    The association "Moselle River 1944" is organizing ceremonies to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the Metz area. They invite 7th Armored Division veterans and families to attend.

    The welcome will occur on Saturday, November 8, and the ceremonies will begin on Sunday, November 9. Saturday, November 15, will mark the "Memory of the Moselle," involving all commemorative groups of the region. Several hundred French participants are expected, many wearing US war uniforms, driving US war vehicles, and bearing flags. Final ceremonies will occur on November 16. Departures from Thionville will begin on November 17. A more detailed itinerary will become available in due course.

    The 2014 commemorations will be free of charge for the 7th Armored veteran and one companion sharing his hotel room. The 7th Armored widow and one companion sharing her hotel room will likewise be hosted for free. Additional family members and spouses will be charged a supplement that will cover the cost of the hotel room. All American guests will pay for their own airfare.

    If you are interested in attending, please contact 10th Armored Division son Jeff Taylor at jeffersontaylor@sbcglobal.net for more details.

    Click here for the invitational letter and photographs of the 2010 ceremonies.

    Welcome to the 7th Armored Division Association home page, maintained by Wesley Johnston, son of Walter Johnston (B/38 AIB). Thanks to Ron Charlton (son of Edward Charlton, HQ/CCR) for the core of the book lists. Thanks to the late Carl Corbin (40th Tank, CCR, and 38 AIB) for the excellent reproduction of the Box Score. Thanks to Niek Hendrix of Ospel, Netherlands for finding many of the web pages by or about 7AD men. And thanks to our dozens of volunteers who have done the tedious work of transcribing thousands of pages for our Document Repository web pages.

    WARNING about Wikipedia and other one-page sources of 7AD "information": There is a web page about the US 7th Armored Division on Wikipedia. In the past, this web page has had significant errors about the Division's history. The page was based on the Army's post-war one-page summary done of 7AD's actions in WWII that was woefully inaccurate, very clearly written by someone who knew very little about what 7AD had really done. For example, the Division was shown moving from France to the Netherlands on 8 October 1944 and going into a defensive role. This completely ignored (a) the 25-26 September move to the Netherlands and (b) the 30 September - 7 October attacks and bitter combat by the Division at Overloon -- not at all a defensive role. And this was just one of many errors. I have attempted to correct the Wikipedia page, but because Wikipedia is open to any updater, someone could come along and post inaccurate information. The bottom line is this: If you really want to know what the Division did, read the history section of this page. If you want to know more, read the many documents on the 7AD Document Repository page, and follow the links on that page to other 7AD pages.


    7th Armored Division History - Volumes I & II - Reprinted

    Many members suggested that we look into another printing of the 7th Armored Division, Volumes I and II. This has been done. To buy the 2-volume set, please contact Cheryl Higley; 7th Armored Division Association Secretary; 292 Scott Swamp Road; Farmington, CT 06032 or phone 860-678-1018 or e-mail cmhig58@sbcglobal.net.


    World War II Veterans Survey
    The US Army Military History Institute (Carlisle, PA) has an 18-page survey form for World War II veterans to record important aspects of their personal experiences. Click here to download the form as a PDF file or here to request the PDF form to be e-mailed to you. Print the form out and complete it in writing; do NOT try to complete it online or you will lose all you typed. Make a copy for your family and a copy to mail to Wesley Johnston for 7th Armored Division historical records. Mail the original to the Military History Institute at the address on the form.

    7TH ARMORED DIVISION ASSOCIATION
    MEMBERSHIP AND CONTACT INFORMATION

    Membership includes a subscription to the excellent "Workshop News". Dues are $15 per year or $85 for a life membership. Contact:

    Cheryl Higley, Secretary
    7th Armored Division Association
    292 Scott Swamp Road
    Farmington, CT 06032

    For more information, contact the 7th Armored Division Association Secretary at cmhig58@sbcglobal.net.


    To have a query or announcement posted in the "Workshop News", contact the Newsletter Editor, Kathleen Kear:

    Kathleen Kear, Editor
    Workshop News
    22610 244th Ave S. E.
    Maple Valley, WA 98038
    E-mail: bigpuddlecountry@earthlink.net


    Association Bylaws
    7TH ARMORED DIVISION ASSOCIATION
    MEMORABILIA FOR SALE

    Make checks payable to
    "7th Armored Division Association"
    and mail to:

    Cheryl Higley, Secretary
    7th Armored Division Association
    292 Scott Swamp Road
    Farmington, CT 06032

    For more information, contact the 7th Armored Division Association Secretary at cmhig58@sbcglobal.net.

    All items have the 7th Armored Division logo in color. All prices include shipping.

    Memorabilia
    • Pens - $2
    • Decals - $3
    • Shoulder Patches - $4
    • Lapel Pins - $7
    • Key Chains - $7
    • Box Score Maps - $6
    • Bolo Ties - $8
    • 2009 Ft. Benning Reunion Challenge Coin - $15
    • 2010 Philadelphia Reunion Challenge Coin - $15
    • 2011 Special Reunion 65th Challenge Coin - $15
    • 2012 Chicago Reunion Challenge Coin - $15
    • 2013 Cincinnati/Verdun Challenge Coin - $15
    • 7th ADA Logo Caps (Black or White) - $11
    • 7th AD Throws - $50
    • Canvas Embroidered Bags - $15
    • License Plate Frames - $11

    Apparel
    Allow 3 weeks for shipping
    All apparel comes with emroidered 7th Armored Division Association Logo
    Golf Shirts - specify:
    1. number of shirts you are buying of each type
    2. color (white or gray)
    3. size
      • SM, MED, LG, X-LG each cost $31
      • 2X-LG costs $37
      • 3X-LG costs $39
      • 4X-LG costs $40
    Men's White Dress Button-down Collar Shirts
    Women's shirts available w/o pocket
    Specify:
    1. number of shirts you are buying of each type
    2. size
      • SM, MED, LG, X-LG each cost $33
      • 2X-LG costs $37
      • 3X-LG costs $39
      • 4X-LG costs $40
    7TH ARMORED DIVISION ASSOCIATION OFFICERS
    President - William E. Boles, A/23
    Immediate Past President - Edward W. Kaminski, C/38
    1st Vice President - John P. Althuizen, B/23
    Secretary - Cheryl M. Higley, DOM-HQ/38
    Treasurer - Edmund M. Burke, C/38
    Directors
    Neil M. Chapin, B/434
    Irvin Cash, A/77
    Edward W. Kaminski, C/38
    Mike Ellis, SOM-C/434
    Steven Minvielle, SOM-HQ/31
    Chaplain - Ken R. Duke, SOM-A/77
    Honorary Chaplain - Joseph De Mato, NOM-147
    Honorary President - Gen. David Petraeus SILOM-E&B/87
    Historian - W. Wesley Johnston, SOM-B/38
    Editor - Kathleen Kear, DOM-C/38
    Nominating Chair - Neil M. Chapin, B/434
    Editor - Kathleen Kear, DOM-C/38
    PAST PRESIDENTS
    Some served more than once but are shown only in their first position.
    Joseph C. Reddy, HQ/48
    James C. Fahl, CCB
    Claude B. Garland, B/31
    William E. "Gene" Jones, B/23
    Glen R. Facklers, A/38
    Douglas T. Greene, CG/CCA
    Quintus Fredrickson, Bn HQ/38
    James E. Hopkins, G-3/Div HQ
    Charles D. Helbig, CCA
    Harry E. "Bud" Edelmann, 147
    Alvie Davis, HQ/38
    John Belt, HQ/440
    John F. Reeks, A/17
    Irving Osias, C/129
    Lloyd Vanny, C/440
    Stephen J. Wales, A/31
    Norman G. J. Jones, Div QM
    Norman W. Horowitz, HQ/129
    John A. Martin, A/17
    Al C. Spinazzola, B/31
    Neil M. Chapin, B/434
    John L. Margreiter, C/23
    Kenneth R. Danielson, Div Arty
    Leon J. Minvielle, Jr., HQ/31
    Carl K. Mattocks, HQ Co/38
    Chewning Watkins, B/203
    Sam H. Sharp, HQ Co/48
    Edwin C. Stewart, B/203
    William D. "Dean" Tommey, C/23
    Thomas W. Dailey, Bn HQ/17
    Donald W. Ketchem, C/23
    Robert E. David, C/40
    Jack Sanford, HQ/31
    Robert Montgomery, A/38
    Edward W. Kaminski, C/38
    7TH ARMORED DIVISION ASSOCIATION HALL OF FAME
    WILLIAM (GENE) JONES
    JOHNNIE WALKER
    STEPHEN J. WALAS
    JOHN REEKS
    GLENN FACKLER
    GENERAL ROBERT HASBROUCK
    IRVING OSIAS
    HARRY E. EDELMANN
    GENERAL WILLIAM KNOWLTON
    GENERAL L.McD. SILVESTER
    GENERAL D. GREENE
    JOE REDDY
    NORMAN G.J. JONES
    ERNEST GRATTINO
    HERMAN HOROWITZ
    WALTER V. COHEN
    JOHN PAMEIJER
    JOHN BRENTIN
    JOHN KERRIGAN
    KENNETH DANIELSON
    JOHN MARGREITER
    COL. NEIL M. CHAPIN
    AL C. SPINAZZOLA
    HAROLD (JIGGS) JOHNSON
    COL. JOHN WEMPLE
    CARL K. MATTOCKS
    DUDLEY BRITTON
    JAMES HOPKINS
    AARON COHEN
    ROBERT H. JOHNSTON
    KOENRAAD MOLENAAR
    CHEWNING WATKINS
    GENERAL BRUCE C. CLARKE
    THOMAS W. DAILEY
    DR. MAURICE DELAVAL
    SAM HOUSTON SHARP
    GENERAL A.J.(ANDY) ADAMS
    WILLIAM A. SHERIDAN
    WILLIAM DEAN TOMMEY
    DONALD W. KETCHEM
    LADDY A. RICE
    CHARLES E. (PAT) BARRY
    ROBERT E. DAVID
    RAYMOND E. DUKE
    CHARLES D. HELBIG
    JACK G. SANFORD
    RAYMOND C. BENOY
    CALVIN C. BOYKIN, JR.
    JOHN P. ALTHUIZEN
    EDWARD W. KAMINSKI
    EDMUND M. BURKE
    MORPHIS A. JAMIEL

    Return to top of 7th Armored Division page


    Webmaster & Historian Wesley Johnston
    Health Status
    Rather than attempt to contact every correspondent with the information about my health, I will post it on the web.
    Click here to see my latest posted health status.
    I am often a human barometer October-April, when storms rolling in off the Pacific put me into hiberination.
    So postal or e-mail sent then may not be answered for weeks.

    Mailing Address
    Wesley Johnston
    1865 Herndon Avenue, Suite K-187
    Clovis, CA 93611-6163

    Do NOT contact me for Association business, such as membership information, putting things into the Association's "Workshop News", etc. For any Association business, see the Association Secretary and "Workshop News" Editor contact information above.


    7TH ARMORED DIVISION WORLD WAR II & KOREA HISTORY:
    The 7th Armored Division fought from August 1944 until V-E Day, coming ashore on the Normandy beaches and reaching all the way to the Baltic Sea.

    7th Armored Division Box Score (small)
    Click on the map for a larger version (77K JPG).
    Text of the Box Score
    Written June or July 1945
    ENEMY
    ARMORED VEHICLES DESTROYED 621
    ARMORED VEHICLES CAPTURED 89
    MISCELLANEOUS VEHICLES DESTROYED 2,653
    MISCELLANEOUS VEHICLES CAPTURED 3,517
    ARMAMENT DESTROYED 583 PIECES
    ARMAMENT CAPTURED 361 PIECES
    (Only pieces larger than 50 mm included)
    PRISONERS TAKEN 113,041
    DIVISION
    MILES TRAVELLED 2,260
    GASOLINE CONSUMED 3,127,151 GALLONS
    AMMUNITION EXPENDED:
    105 mm 550,027 ROUNDS
    76 mm 19,209 ROUNDS
    75 mm 48,724 ROUNDS
    .50 cal 1,267,128 ROUNDS
    .45 cal 540,523 ROUNDS
    .30 cal 9,367,966 ROUNDS
    AWARDS
    * - BATTLE OF NORTHERN FRANCE
    (14 AUG -- 14 SEPT 1944)
    * - BATTLE OF GERMANY
    (15 SEPT 1944 -- ?)

    THE ABOVE CAMPAIGNS HAVE BEEN OFFICIALLY ANNOUNCED. THE FOLLOWING CAMPAIGNS PARTICIPATED IN BY THE DIVISION HAVE BEEN UNOFFICIALLY ANNOUNCED AS SUPERCEDING THE BATTLE OF GERMANY. NO OFFICIAL REPORT HAS BEEN RECEIVED AT THE TIME OF THIS PRINTING AS TO WHETHER OR NOT THE DIVISION WILL BE GRANTED CREDIT FOR HAVING PARTICIPATED IN THEM.
    * - BATTLE OF THE ARDENNES
    (16 DEC 1944 -- 25 JAN 1945)
    * - BATTLE OF THE RHINELAND
    (15 SEPT 1944 -- 21 MAR 1945)
    * - BATTLE OF CENTRAL EUROPE
    (22 MAR 1945 -- ?)
    DECORATIONS**
    (Personnel)
    DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS 9
    SILVER STAR 351
    BRONZE STAR MEDAL: --
    -- HEROIC SERVICE 888
    -- MERITORIOUS SERVICE 1,047
    PURPLE HEARTS 1,211

    (NOTE: ABOVE FIGURE DOES NOT INCLUDE PURPLE HEARTS AWARDED BY NON-DIVISIONAL MEDICAL INSTALLATIONS AND WAR DEPARTMENT)
    A FEW DATES TO REMEMBER
    BEACH LANDINGS -- 10 AUG 1944
    CHARTRES -- 15 AUG 1944
    MELUN -- 24 AUG 1944 (Crossed SEINE River)
    CHATEAU-THIERRY -- 28 AUG 1944
    VERDUN -- 31 AUG 1944
    METZ -- 8 SEPT 1944 (Crossed MOSELLE River)
    OVERLOON -- 1 OCT to 8 OCT 1944
    MEIJEL -- COUNTERATTACK 27 OCT 1944
    ST. VITH -- 17 DEC 1944 and 23 JAN 1945
    REMAGEN (Breakthrough) -- 26 MAR 1945
    EDERSEE DAM -- 30 MAR 1945
    MENDEN -- 16 APR 1945
    BALTIC SEA -- 3 MAY 1945
    ** The Box Score did not include Air Medals. However, the 7AD General Orders awarded 77 Air Medals (51 of which were oakleaf clusters, 3 of which were posthumous).

    7th Armored Division World War II & Korea Timeline

    World War II
    Major combat periods highlighted in bold red.

    Pre-Combat: U. S. Training, Sail for England
    (1 March 1942-8 August 1944)

    United States

    • 1 March 1942 - 18 March 1943: Camp Polk, Louisiana
      • 1 March 1942: 7th Armored Division activated at Camp Polk, Louisiana under command of Gen. Lindsay Silvester
      • 15 September 1942 - 9 November 1942: Louisiana-Texas Maneuvers
    • 11-18 March 1943 - 12 August 1943 Camp Coxcomb; Desert Training Center, California
    • 12 August 1943 - 25 April 1944: Fort Benning, Georgia
      • 20 September 1943: Reorganization of all armored divisions (except 1-3)
    • 22-25 April 1944 - 2 May 1944: Camp Myles Standish, Massachusetts
    • 2 May 1944 - 6 June 1944: Camp Shanks, New York
    • 6 June 1944 - Boarded Queen Mary in New York harbor
    • 7 June 1944 - Set sail for Europe
    Great Britain
    • 13-15 June 1944: Arrived in the Firth of Clyde; debarked at Grenoch, Scotland; moved by train to Tidorth Barracks
    • 15 June 1944 - 7 August 1944: Tidworth Barracks in Wiltshire, England
    • 7 August 1944 - 8 August 1944: Moved to Southampton, England; loaded and boarded landing craft
    • 8 August 1944: Sailed for France
    Combat in Continental Europe
    (10 August 1944 - 8 May 1945)

    France

    • 10-12 August 1944: most of 7AD debarks at Utah and Omaha Beaches; 203 AAA Bn and 814 TD Bn attached to 7AD soon after, for the duration of the war
    • 14-15 August 1944: Rapid move to Chartres, France area; Company B 23rd Armored Infantry Bn ambushed at Marboué, France
    • 15-18 August 1944: Liberation of Chartres, France and other nearby areas, including Rambouillet
    • 19-20 August 1944: 7AD moves to Dreux, France to enable 5AD to support first Seine crossing
    • 21-25 August 1944: Rapid move to Seine at Melun; crossing at Tilly & Ponthierry
    • 26 August-2 September 1944: Rapid dash to Reims and Verdun; Liberation of many places famous as WWI battle sites
    • 2-5 September 1944: Out of gas, except for feint toward Luxemoburg
    • 6-25 September 1944: Bitter combat, with high casualties, in greater Metz area

    Through Belgium to Netherlands
    25-29 September 1944: 7AD passes through Belgium into Netherlands, to bolster corridor created by Operation Market-Garden

    Netherlands

    • 30 September – 8 October 1944: Bitter combat with high casualties at Overloon
    • 9-26 October 1944: Attack across Deurne Canal by Griendtsveen; canal defense and patrols from Meijel to Ell
    • 27-29 October 1944: Bitter combat, with high casualties, defending against German attack at Meijel and nearby areas from Nederweert to Liesel
    • 30 October – 8 November: Liberation of Ospel area with significant casualties
    • 1 November 1944: Gen. Robert Hasbrouck assumes command from Gen. Lindsay Silvester
    • 9-22 November 1944: Reorganization and retraining of Division

    Germany

    • 23 November – 16 December 1944: Elements of 7AD, attached to 84th and 102nd Infantry Divisions, in combat in Gereonsweiler and Linnich areas of Germany; part of Division remains in Netherlands or out of combat at Ubach

    Belgium (second time)

    • 17-23 December 1944: 7AD moves to Vielsalm-St. Vith area, to defend against German Ardennes Offensive (Battle of the Bulge); St. Vith is the most critical strategic point for German supplies in the entire front, and it is denied to them far beyond their timetable, effectively dooming their entire offensive and making possible the defense of Bastogne
    • 23-31 December 1944: 7AD defends Manhay and Grandmenil on the northern shoulder of the Bulge
    • 1-19 January 1945: 7AD reorganizes and re-equips, primarily in the Verviers area
    • 20-28 January 1945: 7AD retakes St. Vith

    Germany (second time)
    Early February 1945: 7AD’s Combat Command R attached to 78th Infantry Division for attacks on Strauch, Simmerath, Steckenborn, and other towns in the area of the Huertgen Forest; rest of the Division is out of combat

    Belgium (third time)
    Mid to late February 1945: When Germans blow their own dams to block Allies’ path, 7AD men are attached to engineers to rebuild roads at Stavelot and Elsenborn; headquarters of 7AD remains in Germany

    Germany (third time)

    • Late February – 24 March 1945: move up to the Rhine River between Cologne and Remagen
    • 25-31 March 1945: Cross the Rhine River and rapidly move to complete the inner southern envelopment of the Ruhr Pocket
    • 1-17 April 1945: Attack west to reduce the Ruhr Pocket
    • Mid-April 1945: Move to Dransfeld, awaiting further orders
    • late April 1945: Move north to the Baltic Sea in the Ludwigslust area
    • early May 45: Task force moves far to the east to meet the Russians
    • 8 May 1945: V-E Day
  • March 45: Germany, area of Mehlem and Bad Godesburg on west bank of Rhine River
  • late March 45: Germany, encirclement of Ruhr Pocket along south and east
  • early April 45: Germany, reduction of Ruhr Pocket
  • late April 45: Germany, north to the Baltic
  • May 45: Germany: meet the Russians; V-E Day
  • Post-Combat: Occupation; Return Home
    (9 May 1945 - 11 October 1945)
    • June - 1 July 45: Occupational duties in Dessau and Köthen by the Elbe River, in the future Soviet Zone of Occupation
    • 1-3 July 45: Move to the U.S. Zone of Occupied Germany
    • 14 July 1945: Large contingent of low-point men departs to train for invasion of Japan
    • July-September 1945: Many high-point men transferred to other units for earlier transport home; many new men transferred into Division
    • 1-11 October 1945: Returned to United States and Inactivated

    Korean War
    Early 1950's: 7AD reactivated during Korean War: at Camp Roberts, CA but never went overseas; Division again inactivated

    Commanding Generals during combat

    • Maj. Gen. Lindsay McDonald Silvester (March 1942 - November 1, 1944)
    • Brig. Gen. [promoted on February 6, 1945 to Maj. Gen.] Robert W. Hasbrouck (November 1, 1944 - August, 1945)
    Concentration Camps and POW Camps Liberated

    This section is still under construction, and the following are unverified, unless otherwise noted. If you have additional informations or corrections, please let me know.

    In February 2014, I researched more on this subject and wrote the following chronological list of camps encountered. However, I am leaving the original section mostly intact, following this new section, since the original section has the text of the original reports. -- Wesley Johnston, 7AD Association Historian


    7AD did not liberate any of the infamous death camps but did see Bergen-Belsen. The Division did liberate several POW camps. Researching this has been a challenge, since there are only brief accounts in the reports: the mission was to destroy the enemy, and the reports mainly focused on that. So here are the camps that I have found, in chronological order, all in 1945.

    After crossing the Rhine, the combat commands of 7AD moved in parallel columns in the double-envelopment of the Ruhr Pocket. All three columns liberated POWs and slave laborers.

    27 Mar – Sinn, Germany – multiple camps (900 POWs plus slave laborers): CCR Task Force Griffin, commanded by 38 AIB CO Lt. Col. Marcus S. Griffin, took Sinn and the crossing of the Dill River. German historian Claudio Michael Becker lives at Sinn and sent this information: “For my hometown SINN, I found interesting information about POW and CW camps on the so-called “Geheime Industriekarte (Secret Industry card)”, which includes information about the things, a factory produced, how many people worked there and how many and what kind of foreign people. The 900 POW´s, which were freed by US Ground Forces of the 7th Armored Division on March, 27th 1945 at Sinn, were not hold in one camp!! Also, there were different orders how to hold which kind of POW or forced slave workers. The Russian and eastern POW´s were held at (at least) 3 different locations in our town.”

    28 Mar – Dulag Luft [air POW transit camp] Wetzlar and Stalag XII-A POWs (about 2,000, mostly American): CCA Task Forces Wemple, Rhea and King took Wetzlar and the air force POW transit camp there. TF King, commanded by CCA Executive Officer Lt. Col. Theo T. King, then moved on to Giessen and Atzbach and liberated the POWs who had been at Stalag XII-A at Limburg. A 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment web page tells one POW’s story: “On the 23rd of March 1945, the POWs left stalag XIIA arriving at Atzbach, Germany in boxcars on March 27th. The next day, on the 28th they were liberated by the 7th Armored Division.” In a 3 Apr 1945 interview, 7AD assistant G-4 officer, Maj. David Roberts said the POWs “were in a pitiful state of well-being”.

    28 Mar – Lollar, Germany – Oflag XII-B POWs (300 British and New Zealand officers): Lollar is on the Lahn River, just north of Giessen. 7AD. CCB Task Force Chappuis, commanded by 48 AIB CO Lt. Col. Richard D. Chappuis, liberated the POWS. Oflag XII-B was at Hadamar, just north of Limburg. Per the official New Zealand WWII history “Prisoners of War” volume (p 463) “On 21 March half the prisoners were taken on lorries 30 or 40 miles to a transit camp at Lollar to await rail transport further east.” The German commandant, knowing 7AD was coming, surrendered himself and 100 guards to a British officer POW about an hour before TF Chappuis arrived at 1500.

    Once the Ruhr Pocket was surrounded, 7AD and the other Allied forces attacked into the pocket from all directions.

    14 Apr – Hemer, Germany – Stalag IV-A (23,000 POWs): CCA Task Forces Dailey (17th Tank Bn X-O Maj. Thomas W. Dailey) was first to reach the camp, followed later by TF Wemple (17th Tank Bn CO, Lt. Col. John P. Wemple). Dailey “instructed the Germans to keep control of the PW's s until some of our forces could take over. He foresaw the impossible situation if all these half-starved prisoners were turned loose on the countryside. However, as most of the guards had already disposed of their weapons and the prisoners were beginning to clip the barbed wire and slip out in twos and threes, it was necessary for TF WEMPLE to send two platoons of infantry and one platoon of light tanks to keep them in the cage.”

    After the collapsing of the Ruhr Pocket, 7AD moved to the area north of Kassel for a rest. 7AD was then ordered north to the Baltic Sea. Their route took them to bivouac at Hermannsburg and other towns near Belsen, Germany.

    1 May – Bergen, Germany – Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp: The British liberated the camp 15 Apr – just a few weeks too late for Anne and Margot Frank who had died there in March. So the camp had been liberated for about 2 weeks when 31st Tank Bn men visited there, taking photos and recording this brief note about the horrors that were all too obvious: “A number of officers and men during the remainder of the morning paid informal visits to the concentration camp at Belsen now under control of the British. The simple statement on a closed grave 'Approximately 1000 persons Buried Here, April 27, 1945' gives some indication of the condition in which the camp was found.”

    7AD and Anne Frank: 7AD made several crossings of Anne Frank’s path, though never near the same time. The map shows 7AD’s route in blue and Anne Frank’s in red. Anne’s family had moved from Germany to Amsterdam, with Anne staying for some time with relatives in Aachen, Germany. So when 7AD troops reached Ubach, Germany, in Dec 1944, 7AD crossed Anne’s path for the first time. With the move to St. Vith, 7AD crossed back. When 7AD moved east from the Rhine, the Division again crossed Anne;s earlier path – just about the time that she was dieing at Bergen-Belsen, which is where the paths crossed for the final time.


    • Concentration Camps
      • Belsen Concentration Camp - visited May 1, 1945 after earlier liberation by British
        31st Tank Battalion Unit History for May 1945
        A number of officers and men during the remainder of the morning paid informal visits to the concentration camp at Belsen now under control of the British. The simple statement on a closed grave 'Approximately 1000 persons Buried Here, April 27, 1945' gives some indication of the condition in which the camp was found.
        Click here for a web page of photographs of the horrors of the Belsen portion of the Bergen-Belsen camp taken by 31st Tank Battalion men.

    • POW Camps
      • Hemer, Germay - Stalag VI-A - April 14, 1945
        • 7th Armored Division After Action Report for April 1945, pp. 37-39 - part of a larger text on the liberation of this camp and the conditions found; click here to go to this complete report.
          The next important objective was the town of HEMER. Operations against the town itself were temporarily suspended at 1200 while the CO of TF DAILEY, Major THOMAS DAILEY, Executive Officer, 17th Tank Battalion, was taken behind enemy lines in an attempt to negotiate a peaceful entry of our troops into HEMER. The Germans wished to declare it an open city because of the presence of slightly over 23000 allied prisoners in a prison camp just outside the town. However„ the German General's terms* were unsatisfactory and at 2030 the attack was resumed. ... TF WEMPLE held control of the woods on the high ground southwest of HEMER, TF DAILEY had moved south of the town, and TF DANUBE (3/395) had attacked, seized and secured SUDWIG (0839) under moderate artillery and AT fire at 1250. These positions were consolidated and tanks and TD's deployed so that they could fire into the town. At 2030 TF DANUBE attacked and secured HEMER with TF RHEA, TF WEMPLE, and TF DAILEY prepared to support with direct fire across their front if they needed it. ... At 1600, the tank company commander and the battalion S-2 of the 17th Tk Bn who were in the assault wave of TF WEMPLE, walked to the large PW enclosure that was at the foot of the hill west of their position. Here they were met by a German officer bearing a note stating that there were 23000 allied prisoners of war in the enclosure whom the officials were ready to surrender to our forces. The tank CO and S-2 were taken to the Camp Commandant where they learned that Major THOMAS DAILEY CO of TF DAILEY and at that time negotiating for the surrender of HEMER, had already been there and instructed the Germans to keep control of the PW's s until some of our forces could take over. He foresaw the impossible situation if all these half-starved prisoners were turned loose on the countryside. However, as most of the guards had already disposed of their weapons and the prisoners were beginning to clip the barbed wire and slip out in twos and threes, it was necessary for TF WEMPLE to send two platoons of infantry and one platoon of light tanks to keep them in the cage.
        • 17th Tank Battalion After Action Report for April 1945, p. 12 - part of a larger text on the liberation of this camp and the taking of Hemer; click here to go to this complete report.
          The position was consolidated and the tanks and TD's were deployed so that they could fire into the town of Hemer. The tank company commander and the Bn S-2 were with the assault wave and they walked down to the large PW enclosure, which was at the foot of the hill west of our objective, where they were met by a German officer bearing a note stating that there were 24000 allied Prisoners of War in the enclosure which the officials were ready to surrender to our forces. The tank CO and the S-2 entered the enclosure and were taken to the camp commandant, here they learned that Major T W Dailey who commanded TF Dailey had already been there and instructed the Germans to keep control of the PW's until some of our forces could take over. However, most of the German guards had disposed of their weapons and the prisoners were beginning to break out of the enclosure so TF Wemple sent two platoons of infantry and a platoon of light tanks down to keep the Russians in the cage. It would have been an impossible situation had all of the 24000 half starved prisoners been released.
          Major Dailey entered the town of Hemer and was escorted to a German Hq to discuss surrender of the town. This negotiation continued until late in the afternoon when our division refused the terms of the German commanding general. Late in the afternoon TF Wemple was ordered to maintain control of the prison camp and to support TF Danube by direct fire across their front if they needed it. TF Danube was to be prepared to attack and secure Hemer at 2030.
          At 2315 we were informed that we would be relieved of the prison camp guard duties sometime during the night or early morning by 3/395 Inf Regt, but that we would remain in place awaiting further orders.
          At 2325 the CP group was moved into a house on the eastern edge of Hemer and the tanks remained on the original objective in the vicinity of coordinates 035096. The entire infantry company, B/23, was engaged in guarding the prison camp.
          15 April 1945: We were finally completely relieved of the prison camp guard duty at 1015.
      • Giessen, Germany: See Lollar below
      • Limburg, Germany: Stalag on the Lahn River - March 1945 - Highly Unlikely
        • Claudio Michael Becker (cbfw190@t-online.de) reports: "Also, the 7th liberated a STALAG at Limburg at the Lahn River." [WESLEY JOHNSTON NOTE: See the narrative version above, which clarifies that the Limburg Stalag POWs that 7AD liberated were not at Limburg when they were liberated.]
      • Lollar, Germany - Oflag XII-B: March 28, 1945 - liberated 300 British and New zealand officers
        • 48th Armored Infantry Battalion Unit History for 1945
          The battalion cleared Oberhausen at 0600 on the 28th and moved north and then east to Loller where it freed Oflag 12B, the German PW camp for British officers and generals. Among the 300 officers were 13 brigadiers.
        • 7th Armored Division After Action Report for March 1945 (p. 33)
          LIBERATION OF POW'S TF CHAPPUIS of Combat Command "B" had the pleasant experience at 281500 of liberating about 300 British officers, including 14 Generals, held prisoner in OFLAG 12B. This German prisoner of war of war camp located near LOLLAR had actually been in Allied hands about an hour before the leading elements of the task force reached it. At that time, the German commander had assembled his guards, numbering about 100, taken up all their weapons and turned himself and his men over to the British officers in formal surrender. As the rear of the column passed, the British flag could be seen waving from the enclosure pole.
        • Click here to see the text of a New Zealand book that gives accounts of the liberation of Oflag XII-B's prisoners who had been been marched from Oflag XII-B's location at Hadamar, Germany to Lollar, Germany to await transport elsewhere but were liberated by 7th Armored Division.
      • Sinn, Germany: March 27, 1945 - liberated 900 POWs
        • Claudio Michael Becker (cbfw190@t-online.de) reports: "For my hometown SINN, I found interesting information about POW and CW camps on the so-called "Geheime Industriekarte (Secret Industry card)", which includes information about the things, a factory produced, how many people worked there and how many and what kind of foreign people. The 900 POW´s, which were freed by US Ground Forces of the 7th Armored Division on March, 27th 1945 at Sinn, were not hold in one camp!! Also, there were different orders how to hold which kind of POW or forced slave workers. The Russian and eastern POW´s were held at (at least) 3 different locations in our town."
        • Combat Command "R" After Action Report for March 27, 1945
          27 March 1945 TF Griffin continued attack to the E, secured the crossings over Dill R at Sinn and Edingen.
          TF Brown attacked to the NE and secured crossings over Dill R at Katzenfurt. Plans were completed to continue attack to the E to securing crossings over the Lahn R at Bellnhausen, Roth, Neiderweimer.
      • Wetzlar / Giessen, Germany: March 28, 1945 - liberated 1,000-2,000 American POWs
        • Claudio Michael Becker (cbfw190@t-online.de) reports: "There are several photos and a silent movie in the National Archive at College Park Maryland about this." and "Countless numbers of POW and CW camps were also liberated, as the 7th captured the district of Wetzlar and the Dill River district in late March 1945."
          • Dulag Luft at Wetzlar
          • POW train with nearly 2,000 POW's, close to Wetzlar
        • Combat Interview "BRIDGEHEAD BREAKOUT 26-31 March, 1945 7th ARMD DIV" by 2nd Info & Hist Service 1st Lt. R. E. Maxwell Sgt. H. R. George" [Interview with Lt Col Reginald H. Hodgson, G-4, 7th Armd Div and Maj. David Roberts, Asst G-4, 7th Armd Div at Div CP, vic Frankenau Germany, 3 April 1945 by Sgt Harvey R. George, 2d Info and Hist Sv (III Corps), pp. 5-6]
          At 1300 hours, 28 Mar, CCA sent a message that 1000 American PW had been liberated at ATZBACH (G604203), and requested transportation for them. They were American PWs who were being marched from LIMBURG when they were liberated and were in a pitiful state of well-being. It was planned to take them to Stalag Luft PW camp at WETZLER to be cared for by Air Corps officers who had been liberated that morning. Col. (name not filled in), the Division Surgeon went to CCA to assist in taking care of the American PWs and was able to get them under roofs, school-buildings etc. The Division QM was directed, that night, to send rations, D.T. powder and blankets for these men. Col Hodgson stated that the truck carrying the ration got lost and never did reach the men. Maj Roberts then went down at this time and moved the men to a permanent camp at WETZLER.
        • Combat Command "A" After Action Report for March 28, 1945
          Wetzlar was cleared on 28 Mar 45 and CC "A"'s three Task Force columns, Wemple, Rhea, and King pushed East towards Giessen, Germany. Stiffer resistance was offered at Giessen than at any of the other places along the route of CC "A"'s advance but the town was cleared and outposted at 2130 28 Mar 45. Included in the bag for operations on this day were 19 88-mm guns, 7 20-mm guns, and a number of AT weapons of unidentified caliber. It was in the Vic of Giessen that a German PW camp containing approximately 1000 Allied Prisoners of War, the majority American soldiers, was overrun, freeing the captives.

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    7TH ARMORED DIVISION WORLD WAR II AWARDS

    Contents

  • Unit Citations
  • High Personal Awards to Division Personnel

    For all questions relating to U. S. Army awards, including where to write for replacement medals, see The Institute of Heraldry, U. S. Army, webpage on Decorations and Awards.


    Unit Citations

    Click on the links(the name of the award) for each one, to be able to print off a copy of the General Orders, if you are planning to submit a request for the physical award. These are Microsoft Word documents.

    • Belgian Fourragère for entire 7th Armored Division and non-divisional attached units [Department of the Army General Orders No. 43, dated 19 December 1950]
      Michael Furlich succeeded in receiving his Belgian Fourragere by writing to U. S. Army Human Resources Command; 200 Stovall Street; Alexandria, VA 22332-0400 and including a copy of his DD214 discharge papers and a copy of the citation.

    • Netherlands Resistance Cross (Verzetsherdenkingskruis) for entire 7th Armored Division - awarded 6 October 1982 [pursuant to Royal Decision of December 29, 1980, Number 104]
      The link is to page 326 of "Lucky Seventh" volume 1, which shows the front and rear of the medal and contains the complete authorizing text.

    • Presidential Unit Citation only for Combat Command "B", including the following units, for action at St. Vith, Belgium 17-23 December 1944 [Department of the Army General Orders No. 48, dated 12 July 1948]
      Headquarters and Headquarters Company of CCB; 17th Tank Battalion; 31st Tank Battalion; 23d Armored Infantry Battalion; 38th Armored Infantry Battalion; 87th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron Mechanized (less Troop D); 275th Armored Field Artillery Battalion; 434th Armored Field Artillery Battalion; 965th Field Artillery Battalion; 168th Engineer Combat Battalion; 1st Platoon, Company F, 423d Infantry Regiment; Company B, 33d Armored Engineer Battalion; Company A, 814th Tank Destroyer Battalion (SP)


    High Personal Awards to Division Personnel
    If there is a link indicated for a name, click on the link to see the citation and a photograph of the soldier.

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    7TH ARMORED DIVISION UNITS AND CODE NAMES:
    The 7th Armored Division consisted of the following organic and attached units (code names, starting with W for organic elements, appear in parentheses):

    Organic Units

    Long-Term Attached Units
    Foreign nationals who fought for 7th Armored Division
    Short-Term Attached Units
    Other Units
    • 9th Armored Group: Source of many CCR Replacements in January 1945
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    7TH ARMORED DIVISION OVERSEAS DEATHS:
    It is surprising to learn that the definitive list of overseas deaths for the 7th Armored Division has yet to be made. The first attempt at such a list was the June 30, 1947 list compiled by the Adjutant General. The list is mostly accurate, but detailed research on 38th Armored Infantry Battalion deaths revealed 12 men who were not included on the 1947 list, as well as several mis-spellings. And subsequent work with other elements of the Division has also found men who were not on the 1947 list. Some of these were non-battle deaths (the 1947 list was only battle deaths), and some were still officially missing in action in 1947, but some were just plain missed by the Adjutant General's list.

    The deaths for each unit of the Division are on separate web pages, accessible from the unit web pages (see above). However, the existing links are duplicated here, so that the units can be placed in order of the number of deaths suffered. The initial entries were from the 1947 Adjutant General's list, except for 38 AIB which includes a great deal of additional research. However, as others -- who were not on the 1947 list -- have been identified, they have been added to the web pages. For this listing, the long-term attached units (see above) are not distinguished from organic units.

    These figures WILL change as more information becomes available for all of the units. This list is the most definitive list there is of 7th Armored Division deaths in World War II, but it WILL change as more men are found who were not included on the initial 1947 list.

    Click here for the alphabetical list of all 7th Armored Division deaths.
    Use the alphabetical list as an index to find what Battalion/Unit a man was in, so that you can then go to the web page for the deaths of that Battalion for further information about him.

    Click here for the list of all 7th Armored Division deaths, grouped by last duty location and date.
    Use this list to see what is known so far about which men died in which battles.

    Click here for a web page about the Unknowns of the ETO (European Theater of Operations)..
    This page contains many 7AD references but covers all unknowns in the ETO.

    Tom Lutge, son of A/38 & B/48 veteran Albert Lutge, has created a memorial web site of grave/cemetery photos of many 7AD men. Click here to go to that site.

    Currently known total: 1,367 deaths (* see note below)

    • LATEST ADDITIONS AND REMOVALS:
      • Feb 2014: Edward S. Lenda - added to HQ Co/23 AIB, since he died in France or Belgium from accidental shooting
      • Nov 2012: John N. Scholes - removed from 87th Cav Rcn Sq, since he was actually in 89 Rcn in 9AD
      • Nov 2012: Allen O. Berryhill - removed from 87th Cav Rcn Sq, since he was actually in 89 Rcn in 9AD
      • Sep 2011: Clarkson A. Russell - added to A/23 AIB, since he died as a POW
      • May 2011: Lawrence N. Barnwell - removed from C/23 AIB, since he was actually in F/333/84ID
      • August 2010: Sgt. O' Malley - removed from C/48 AIB, since he was the confusion of two other men in a third man's memory; Thurman, Broomfield removed from 87 Rcn, since were in 89 Rcn/9AD; Dupler removed from 87 Rcn, since was in 81 Rcn/1AD (Thurman is new; Broomfield & Duper were removed long ago but not flagged here)
      • July 2010: Wilbert J. Forsythe - removed from 33 Engr, since he was actually in 33rd Armd Regt of 3rd Armored Division
      • May 2009: Andrew S. Grzys (23 AIB) - Captured at St. Vith; died as POW; remains never found
      • September 2008: Grady Frazier (48 AIB) - Determined that this was actually Grady Blazier, who was already listed; Added Raymond Deroboam (33 AEB)
      • August 2008: Edward Kasmarski (203 AAA) - Determined that he was killed in training in the States; so he has been removed from the ETO deaths and added to the web page of training deaths
      • July 2008: Joseph Guido (23 AIB) - Determined that he was not killed in the 15 Aug 44 ambush at Marboué, France and survived that only to be injured in action 21 Aug 44; so he has been removed from the 23 AIB list of dead
      • November 2007: Luther Ferrell (48 AIB) - Thanks to nephew Mark McLaurin and C/48 Morning Reports
      • August 2007: Atkins Frenchman (23 AIB) - POW who died after liberation from tuberculosis contracted while POW
      • April 2007: Richard Whalen (48 AIB) - Thanks to 48 AIB Unit History, transcribed by Charles Barry, veteran of B/48; Lawton Gay (31 Tank) - Thanks to 31 Tank Unit History, transcribed by 31 Tank daughter Nayda Colomb
      • March 2007: John Yeakley (31 Tank) - Thanks to 31st Tank Bn Unit History March 1945, transcribed by Nayda Colomb, daughter of C/31 and A/31 veteran Floyd Swonger
      • February 2007: yet-unidentified enlisted man in Division Trains HQ Company shown as KIA 25 Aug 1944 in the 7AD G-1 Journal
      • May 2005: James K. Hall (B/87); Ervin L. Bagwell (48 AIB); George J. Dolezal & Frank T. Sigl (489 AFAB)
      • April 2005: Ernest H. Nevins and Peter J. Predovic (87 Recon) - Thanks to Beverly Kent, daughter of B/87 veteran Eugene O' Connor
      • March 2005: John T. Williams (87 Recon) - Thanks to Beverly Kent, daughter of B/87 veteran Eugene O' Connor
      • May 2004: Joe M. Attebery (48 AIB) - Thanks to Niek Hendrix of Ospel, Netherlands
      • December 2003: Geoffrey Wrigley (87) - Thanks to Beverly Kent, daughter of B/87 veteran Eugene O' Connor; Remove Robert Parker (38) - had been based on burial report now found to be erroneous
      • February 2003: Bladecki (77); 3 from 3967 (Brown, Fullman, Washington); 2 from 203 (Haefele, Schlueter)
      • January 2003: Copen (17 Tank), Crow (23 AIB), 3 from 87 Recon (Guzik, Jarratt, Morrison), Klippel (440 AFAB), Moran (489 AFAB) - Thanks very much to Richard Heus of Gorinchem in the Netherlands for the many updates to those men buried at Margraten, including these 7 new names.
      • December 2002: Pfc. Duncan Forbes, Jr. (434 AFAB)
      • October 2002: Sgt. O'Malley (48 AIB) [removed August 2010]
      • September 2002: 12 men from 203rd AAA
      • Earlier additions: Kenneth Sherman (33 Engr), David Geikie (33 Engr), Lucious Sumrall (33 Engr), Frederick Roemer (33 Engr), William R. Allison (33 Engr), Robert Hicks (MP), Robert Barth (CCB), Louis Vroble (203 AAA), Lawrence Barnwell (23 AIB)

    First Deaths:

    • First Stateside Death: Pvt. Raymond D. Kuhrt (HQ Co/87th Armored Reconnaissance Battalion), non-combat death at Camp Polk, LA, 12 May 1942
    • First Overseas Death: Pfc. Alvin W. Thompson (B/38 AIB), non-combat death in England 17 Jun 1944
    • First Combat Deaths - The first combat deaths were 14 Aug 1944. Based on the route the Division took and the locations of the deaths, I believe the following is the order in which the first combat deaths occurred 14 Aug 1944.
      1. 1st Sgt. Robert W. Norton (3/31 Tank), killed along a secondary road in a thickly wooded area near Saint-Denis-d'Orques, France
      2. Two simultaneous deaths, killed in action approaching La Loupe, France, probably about 1.5 miles south of La Loupe, both from Troop "B", 87th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron
        • Sgt. Charles G. Muller
        • Pfc. Martin C. Werling
      3. Two killed in action at Senonches, France
        • 2nd Lt. James Earl Newberry, Jr. (Platoon Leader AT/A/48 AIB)
        • Tec 4 William V. Vitez (A/40 Tank)
      4. 1st Lt. James O. Gomer (Platoon Leader Rcn/HQ Co/23 AIB), killed in action at Courville, France

    Counts by Unit: Note: While each unit has a photo page link, not all of these are working links, since I do not have photos for some units. If you have a photo of one of the 7AD dead, please contact me.

    No deaths in:
    • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Combat Command R (CCR)
    • Band
    • 446th Quartermaster Truck Company

    Counts by type of unit: (% based on 1,359 deaths on list as of December 2003)

    • Armored Infantry Battalion (3 units): 769 deaths (56.6%)
    • Tank Battalion (3 units): 255 deaths (18.8%)
    • Reconnaissance Squadron (1 unit): 112 deaths (8.2%)
    • Armored Engineer Battalion (1 unit): 75 deaths (5.5%)
    • Artillery of All Types (5 units): 70 (5.2%)* [3 AFA Bns, AAA, Div Arty]
    • Tank Destroyer Battalion (1 unit): 52 deaths (3.8%)
    • Combat Command Headquarters (3 units): 8 deaths (0.5%)
    • Division HQ Units (3 units with deaths): 5 (0.4%) [HQ, MP, Trains]
    • Armored Medical Battalion (1 unit): 4 deaths (0.3%)
    • Signal Company (1 unit): 3 deaths (0.2%)
    • Armored Ordnance Battalion (1 unit): 3 deaths (0.2%)
    • Quartermaster Company (2 units): 3 death (0.2%)


    7TH ARMORED DIVISION PRE-COMBAT DEATHS:
    The 7th Armored Division men who died in training in the States and in England are not counted in the casualty lists. They have gone almost entirely forgotten. In September 2005, Wesley Johnston spent 2 weeks at the National Archives and scanned the complete General Orders of the 7th Armored Division, for all years (1942-1945). Many of the General Orders during the period of training, prior to combat, are announcements of the deaths of 53 men. Other men learned from the sacrifice of these men, and their deaths probably saved the lives of unknown numbers of others.

    Click here to see the web page that memorializes these 53 men.


    BOOKS AND RESEARCH MATERIALS SPECIFICALLY ABOUT THE 7TH ARMORED DIVISION:

    This section has three sub-sections:

    1. Division-wide works
    2. Works on component units
    3. Published Memoirs/Histories/Web Pages by or about 7th Armored Division Men
    1. Division-wide works
      • General Coverage
        • Seventh Armored Division. From the Beaches to the Baltic: The Story of the 7th Armored Division. June, 1945.
        • Seventh Armored Division Association. The Lucky Seventh. Dallas: Taylor Publishing Company, 1982. (out of print)
        • Seventh Armored Division Association. The Lucky Seventh. Vol. II. Dallas: Taylor Publishing Company, 1987. (out of print)
        • 7th Armored Division Auxiliary Web Site: Growing repository of thousands of transcriptions of WWII documents (text-only) of and related to 7th Armored Division that are available for free downloads. This is a treasure trove of information.

      • 7th Armored Division in France (August-September 1944)
        • Hospital Interviews of the 7th Armored Division: France: August-September 1944. (Click here for details and ordering information.)
        • Combat Interviews of the 7th Armored Division: France: August-September 1944. (Click here for details and ordering information.)

      • 7th Armored Division in the Battle of the Bulge (Belgium, December 1944 - January 1945)
        • Combat Interviews of the 7th Armored Division: The St. Vith Salient (December 1944). (Click here for details and ordering information.)
        • Combat Interviews of the 7th Armored Division: The 7th Armored Division Goes Back: St. Vith 20-23 January 1945. (Click here for details and ordering information.)
        • Ellis, William D. and Thomas J. Cunningham, Jr. Clarke of St. Vith: The Sergeants' General. Cleveland: Dillon/Liederbach, 1974.
        • US Army Armor School Research and Evaluation Division. The Defense of St. Vith, Belgium 17-23 December 1944: An historical example of armor in the defense. Fort Knox: Armored School. (Click here for information about this book.)
        • Boyer at St. Vith: Major Donald P. Boyer's "Personal Report: Narrative Account of Action of 38th Armored Infantry Battalion, 7th Armored Division, Battle of St. Vith, 17-22 December 1944" and "Notes - The Battle of St. Vith, 17-22 December 1944" (Click here for information about this book.)
        • Winter, George. Manhay, The Ardennes: Christmas 1944. Winnipeg, Manitoba: J. J. Fedorowicz Publishing, 1990.

      • 7th Armored Division Returns to Germany (March-April 1945: first entry into Germany was in November 1944, prior to move to Belgium)
        • Combat Interviews of the 7th Armored Division: Remagen Bridge and Breakout (March 1945). (Click here for details and ordering information.)
        • Combat Interviews of the 7th Armored Division: Encircling and Reducing the Ruhr Pocket (April 1945). (Click here for details and ordering information.)

    2. Works on component units

    3. Published Memoirs/Histories/Web Pages By/About 7th Armored Division Men
      • Goodwin, Marden Ronald (with 7AD Combat Commands in training, 1942): "Of War and Women"
        Marden Goodwin was drafted in July 1941 and cadréd from 3rd Armored Division to become one of the original members of the 7th Armored Division 1 March 1942. He was with all of the Combat Commands at one time or another, until he was sent to Ft. Knox for radio school, leaving 7th Armored in August 1942. He went on to OCS and then went into France with the 5th Infantry Division, which fought alongside the 7th Armored Division in France in XX Corps of Third US Army in August and September 1944, when 7th Armored was sent up to Holland. Goodwin stayed with the 5th Infantry Division until the end of the Bulge. At that time, Gen. Kilburn, Commanding General of 11th Armored Division, asked for Goodwin's transfer to 11th Armored, since they had been together in 7th Armored's CCA at Camp Polk. So on verbal orders of Gen. Patton, Goodwin went to 11th Armored -- only to have Gen. Kilburn replaced as CG in a few weeks. All in all, he spent 4 1/2 years in the Army during the war. His story "Of War and Women" is now published and available online. "Of War and Women" is available by mail from the publisher (see below) or online at Amazon.com. If you order from the publisher and indicate you are a member of the 7th Armored Division Association (or 3rd or 11th Armd or 5th Inf) and they confirm your name on the list of members, then the author has very generously extended a 50% discount off the retail price of the book to you. Contact the publisher at Minerva Publishing Company; 1001 Brickell Bay Dr., Suite 2310; Miami, FL 33131; Phone: (305) 358-1560; E-mail: minervap@bellsouth.net

      • Hazenberg, John (B/40 Tank): Niece Trudy Fetters' book "Cpl John Peter Hazenberg Letters Home to Grand Rapids, Michigan World War II: 7th Armored Division, 40th Tank Battalion, Company B" - PDF file of images
        Cpl. John Peter Hazenberg served with B/40 throughout the war, suffering trench foot. Not only are his wartime letters of importance. But after the war when he was stationed at Terneuzen, Netherlands, where a family there recognized John's surname as the Groningen family Hazenberg surname. The Dutch family and their relatives wrote a total of 15 letters in Dutch, starting in September 1945, to John's family in Grand Rapids, MI. These letters give a sense of what life was like in the Netherlands during and after the war.

      • McCord, Howard "Mutt" (Mortar/HQ Co/38 AIB): Reminiscences
        Sgt. Howard "Mutt" McCord was in the Heavy (81mm) Mortar Platoon of Headquarters Company of the 38th Armored Infantry Battalion, until he was captured at Crombach, Belgium in December 1944. This web site, from Camp Croft, SC recounts his experiences before and with the 7th Armored Division, as well as his experiences as a POW.

      • Moranda, Robert (CO of MG/HQ Co/38 AIB): "Bob's Story: Memories of Love and War"
        2nd Lt. Robert Moranda commanded the Heavy Machine Gun Platoon of Headquarters Company of the 38th Armored Infantry Battalion, until he was captured at St. Vith, Belgium in December 1944. His book about his experiences, "Bob's Story: Memories of Love and War", co-authored with his brother George Moranda, is available at IUniverse.com and Amazon.com.

      • Rutledge, Robert (48 AIB, KIA 29 Oct 1944) A Daughter Lovingly Remembers Her Dad: 5 web pages
        This is a World War II Stories ... Their Stories Told in Their Own Words" web site.

      • Silvester, Lindsay McDonald (Div CG): "Stars Saves Bars!"
        An Opelika, AL newspaper article about how Gen. Silvester rescued downed fighter pilot 1st Lt. Ike Dorsey near Amanvilliers, France on September 11, 1944

      • Triplett, William S. (CO of CCA): "A Colonel in the Armored Divisions"
        Col. William S. Triplet assumed command of Combat Command "A" of 7th Armored Division after the defense of St. Vith. He wrote a frank personal memoir, which was found and edited and published by Robert H. Ferrell (this is just one of several volumes, starting with his World War I service). "A Colonel in the Armored Divisions" is available at University of Missouri Press and Amazon.com.

      • Varney, Maynard (40 Tank, KIA 12 Apr 1945) honored by Saratoga County, NY (May 2002)
        Maynard Varney was killed in action April 12, 1945, while serving as a tank gunner with 40th Tank Battalion, during the reduction of the Ruhr Pocket in Germany. Saratoga County, NY recently honored him and presented a Conspicuous Service Cross to him in a presentation to his son, James Varney. Click here to see the newspaper article and photo. (Thanks to Frederick R. Miller, PH1, USN Retired for sending this information.) You can find a bit more on Maynard Varney on the web page of 40th Tank Battalion Deaths.

      • Wampers, Peter (Belgian Underground and D/17 Tank): "True Heroes, True Friends"
        Peter's web pages on his wartime experiences. Sadly, Peter died June 22, 2000, and his web site was discontinued. So the link no longer works.

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    BOOKS THAT MENTION THE 7TH ARMORED DIVISION:
    Note that books that mention specific organic or attached units are also under the links to those units.

    The official US Army history books can be ordered from the US Government Printing Office's online bookstore: click on this link and scroll down to "United States Army in World War II Series".

    • 106th Infantry Division. Combat Interviews of the 106th Infantry Division. (Click here for details and ordering information.).
    • Allen, Robert S. Lucky Forward: The History of Patton's Third U.S. Army. New York: Vanguard Press, 1947.
    • Altes, A. Korthals and N.K.C.A. in't Veld. The Forgotten Battle: Overloon and the Mass Salient 1944-45. New York: Sarpedon Publishers, 1995.
    • Astor, Gerald. A Blood-Dimmed Tide: The Battle of the Bulge by the Men who Fought It. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc., 1992 and New York: Dell Publishing, 1994.
    • Bauserman, John M. The Malmédy Massacre. Shippensburg, PA: White Mane Publishing, 1995.
    • Blair, Clay. Ridgway's Paratroopers. Garden City, NY: The Dial Press, 1985.
    • Blumenson, Martin. Breakout and Pursuit. Washington: Office of the Chief of Military History, United States Army, 1989.
    • Pascal Bulois - Marboué Bulois, Pascal. Marboué, 15 Août 1944 ("Marboué, 15 August 1944: History of the tragic ambush of an American column of the 7th Armored Division, 15 August 1944") -- NOTE: This book is in French.
      Pascal Bulois has done a great deal of research to establish the names of American soldiers who were killed in the Chartres-Châteaudun area, so that they could be permanently inscribed on monuments. This book relates the story of the ambush by the Germans of the column of Company "B" of 23rd Armored Infantry Battalion at the town of Marboué on the evening of August 15, 1944, including interveiws with B/23 veterans and with local French citizens. The very deadly ambush destroyed seven half-tracks and a jeep and killed the men whose names are inscribed on the monument, which you can see in the Monuments section of the 7th Armored Division web page. If you were there at the ambush, Pascal Bulois wants to hear from you to include your account in future editions of the book. You can contact him about contributing your information to the book or about obtaining a copy, via e-mail at PASCAL.BULOISMVAL@wanadoo.fr or by postal mail at Pascal Bulois; Boite Postal 44; 28160 BROU, France.

    • Cole, Hugh M. The Lorraine Campaign. Washington: Office of the Chief of Military History, United States Army, 1950.
    • Cole, Hugh M. The Ardennes: Battle of the Bulge. Washington: Office of the Chief of Military History, United States Army, 1965.
    • D'Este, Carlo. Patton: A Genius for War. New York: Harper Collins, 1995.
    • Delaval, Maurice. Saint-Vith au cours de l'ultime Blitzkrieg de Hitler: Témoignages non conformistes recueillis. Vielsalm, Belg.: Editions J. A. C., 1984.
    • Dupuy, R. Ernest. St. Vith: Lion in the Way: The 106th Infantry Division in World War II. Nashville: Battery Press, 1986 reprint of original from late 1940's.
    • Dupuy, Trevor N, David L. Bongard, & Richard C. Anderson, Jr. Hitler's Last Gamble: The Battle of the Bulge, December 1944 - January 1945. Harper Collins, 1994.
    • Eisenhower, John S. D. The Bitter Woods: The Dramatic Story, Told at All Echelons - from Supreme Command to Squad Leader - of the Crisis that Shook the Western Coalition: Hitler's Surprise Ardennes Offensive. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1969 and Da Capo, 1995.
    • Gavin, James. On to Berlin: Battles of an Airborne Commander 1943-1946. Viking Press, 1978.
    • Giles, Janice Holt. The Damned Engineers. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1970.
    • Goldstein, Donald M., Katherine V. Dillon, & J. Michael Wenger. Nuts!: The Battle of the Bulge, the Story and Photographs. Washington: Brassey's, 1994.
    • Goolrick, William K. and Tanner, Ogden. The Battle of the Bulge. Alexandria, VA: Time-Life Books, 1979.
    • Hamilton, Nigel. Monty. New York: Random House, 1994.
    • Kemp, Anthony. The Unknown Battle: Metz, 1944. New York: Stein and Day, 1981.
    • MacDonald, Charles B. The Last Offensive. Washington: Office of the Chief of Military History, United States Army, 1973.
    • MacDonald, Charles B. Three Battles: Arnaville, Altuzzo and Schmidt. Washington: Office of the Chief of Military History, United States Army, 1952.
    • MacDonald, Charles B. A Time for Trumpets: The Untold Story of the Battle of the Bulge. New York: William Morrow and Company, 1984 and Bantam Books, 1985.
    • MacDonald, Charles B. The Siegfried Line Campaign. Washington: Office of the Chief of Military History, United States Army, 1990.
    • Merriam, Robert E. Dark December: The Full Account of the Battle of the Bulge. Chicago: Ziff Davis Publishing, 1947. (republished as The Battle of the Bulge. New York: Ballantine Books, 1957.)
    • Morelock, J. D. Generals of the Ardennes: American Leadership in the Battle of the Bulge. National Defense University Press, 1994.
    • Pallud, Jean-Paul. The Battle of the Bulge: Then and Now. London: Battle of Britain Prints International Limited, 1984.
    • Pallud, Jean-Paul. Ardennes 1944: Peiper and Skorzeny. London: Osprey Publishing, 1987.
    • Parker, Danny S. Battle of the Bulge: Hitler's Ardennes Offensive, 1944-1945. Philadelphia: Combined Books, 1991.
    • Patton, George S. Jr. War As I Knew It. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1947.
    • Pergrin, Col. David E. First Across the Rhine: The Story of the 291st Engineer Combat Battalion. New York: Ivy Books, 1989.
    • Perret, Geoffrey. There's a War to Be Won: The United States Army in World War II. New York: Random House, 1991.
    • Reynolds, Michael. The Devil's Adjutant: Jochen Peiper, Panzer Leader. New York: Sarpedon, 1995.
    • Eric Santin - Derniers Combats Santin, Eric. Derniers Combats ("Final Battles: 1944 Eure-et-Loir: Chartres, Châteaudun, Nogent-le-Rotrou") -- NOTE: This book is in French.
      Eric Santin's book is a treasure trove of photographs, a great many taken by French citizens and not seen in American publications. But the research behind the text is just as valuable. His research is excellent -- which is quite a challenge for his outstanding new history "Derniers Combats: 1944 Eure-et-Loir" about the battles in and around Chartres, Nogent-le-Rotrou and Châteuadun, France. To order the book, send a money order for US $42 to ERIC SANTIN; 9 chemin Lacave; 65220 PUYDARRIEUX, FRANCE. (ericsantin@net-up.com)

    • Stanton, Shelby L. Order of Battle U.S. Army. World War II. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1984.
    • Toland, John. Battle: The Story of the Bulge. New York: Random House, 1959 and Signet (New American Library), 1960.
    • Toland, John. The Last 100 Days. New York: Random House, 1965.
    • Whiting, Charles. Decision at St.-Vith: The Story of the U. S. 106th, the Division Hitler Smashed in the Battle of the Bulge. New York: Ballantine Books, 1969.
    • Whiting, Charles. The End of the War: Europe: April 15 - May 23, 1945. New York: Stein and Day, 1973.
    • Whiting, Charles. Siegfried: The Nazis' Last Stand. New York: Stein and Day, 1982.
    • Whiting, Charles. Ardennes The Secret War. New York: Stein and Day, 1985.
    • Whiting, Charles. The Last Assault: The Battle of the Bulge Reassessed. New York: Sarpedon, 1994.
    • Françoise Winieska - August 1944: The Liberation of Rambouillet, France Winieska, Françoise. August 1944: The Liberation of Rambouillet, France. Rambouillet, France: Société Historique et Archéologique de Rambouillet et de l'Yveline (SHARY), 1999. -- NOTE: This book is in identical sections in both French and English. The French title is "Août 1944: La Libération de Rambouillet, France".
      Françoise Winieska's extraordinarily well-done book has photos, detailed maps, and very detailed accounts. For 7th Armored Division readers, this book is especially relevant to 7th Armored Division's 17th Tank Battalion and 814th Tank Destroyer Battalion.

    • Zaloga, Steven J. Tanks Illustrated No. 2: Battle of the Bulge. London: Arms and Armour Press, 1983.

    Return to top of 7th Armored Division page

    MONUMENTS TO THE 7TH ARMORED DIVISION

    Please let me know of errors or omissions. Unless otherwise noted, the photos are my own.
    The coordinates which appear below some of the place names can be copied and pasted into Google Earth to see where the monument is located.
    Google Earth does not actually show the more recent monuments.

    How to Have an Overseas Monument Erected - Instructions for U. S. Citizens

    Peter Schreiber, son of Justus Schreiber (D/87), succeeded in having a new privately-funded monument dedicated in 2007 at Baraque de Fraiture, Belgium to commemorate the units that had fought there but remained unrecognized. He has very generously provided the following documents for any other American citizen who would like to have an overseas monument erected.

    1. How to Guide: What You Need to Know in Order to Erect a New Overseas War Memorial (1-page Word document)
    2. American Battle Monuments Commission Policies on Overseas Memorials: as published in the Federal Register (3-page PDF document)
    3. Sample Request Letter to ABMC: the actual letter that Pete sent for the Baraque de Fraiture Monument (11-page Word document, with photos)

    Belgium | France | Netherlands | United States | Temporary | Online

    BELGIUM
    Baraque de Fraiture
    (Parker's Crossroads)
    50°14'57.48"N, 5°44'15.08"E

    Dedicated 29 Sep 2007
    Click here for photos of the ceremony.
    Click the following for video of the ceremonies:
    Streaming WMV file (145KB)
    Quicktime MPG file (1.4GB, not streaming)
    Thanks to Carl Wouters for permission to post the video and to Peter Schreiber for obtaining the video and the permission.

    In Memory of
    D Troop 87th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mcnz)
    7th Armored Division
    D Battery, 203rd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion
    7th Armored Division
    F Company 325th Glider Infantry Regiment
    82nd Airborne Division
    who defended this critical crossroads
    against overwhelming forces
    during the period 19-23 December, 1944
    Their courageous defense against repeated attacks
    bought vital time for the defense of the Ardennes.
    Their bravery in fierce battle when heavily outnumbered
    continues to inspire the allies and their countrymen.

    Thanks to Peter Schreiber, son of D/87 crossroads defender Justus Schreiber for his years of work to make this monument a reality.

    (photo thanks to Henri Rogister)

    Click here for detailed information on these men's efforts there.

    Bastogne

    Monument to all units in the Battle of the Bulge
    7th Armored Division in Middle
    (photo thanks to Ernie Gallet, AG/HQ/48 AIB)
    Note that while 7AD passed through Bastogne in September 1944 and a few officers stopped there briefly on 17 December 1944, the Division did not see any combat at Bastogne.
    Malempré

    Plaque in church yard wall, at town square
    Top inscription reads:
    Aux Combatants de Decembre 1944
    Poteau

    7th Armored Division on plaque on wall of museum at Poteau
    Inscription reads:
    18-23 Dec. 1944
    The longest tank battle of American history took place around Poteau during the Battle of the Bulge
    7th Armored Division
    1 - 9 SS Panzer Division
    (photo thanks to Lando Mulleneers of Cadier en Keer, Netherlands)
    Regné
    50.255906 N, 5.777614 E = 50°15'21.26"N, 5°46'39.41"E

    Click on image for full view of monument.
    Erected by Belgian citizens, 4 June 2011
    carved by Alex Baccus, Belgian member of 83rd Thunderbolt Association
    Inscription on plaque reads (in French):
    24 December 1944
    In hommage to 16 American soldiers of whom 5 occupants of a jeep were taken under fire of an enemy tank
    We remember
    Pvt. Jay Derendinger 325th GIR 82nd AB 24-12-44
    Sgt Joseph Pevahouse 325th GIR 82nd AB 24-12-44
    S/Sgt Stephen Jensen 325th GIR 82nd AB 24-12-44
    Pvt. Grover P. Bower 401st GIR 82nd AB 24-12-44
    Pfc. Justus T. Schreiber 87th Cav Rec Sqd 7th AD
    The next day the soldier Schreiber, seriously wounded, will be saved by the Gavroye family at the risk of their lives.
    The Road of Liberty - Bihain 2011
    Rencheux

    One of two plaques at Bridge over Salm River between Vielsalm and Rencheux
    Inscription reads:
    Battle of the Bulge
    Rencheux
    December 23, 1944
    "In Tribute of the Crossers"
    "With utmost respect and gratitude to the American soldiers who crossed the Rencheux Bridge and to the memory of their comrades who gave their lives for the liberation of Belgium and our Peace and Freedom"
    C-47 Club; 82nd Airborne Division; Ardennes Salm River Chapter; September 7, 2013

    Photo thanks to Bernard Maquet
    St. Vith

    7th Armored Division plaque at Police Station on west side of Hauptstrasse
    Inscription reads:
    NOUS AVONS ARRÊTÉ ET ARRÉTONS
    During the crucial period of the German Offensive of the Ardennes in 1944, the American 7th Armored Division held the important center of St. Vith, preventing any advance and any exploitation of this main line, thus frustrating the German Offensive by its sacrifice, permitting the launching of the Allied counter offensive.
    St. Vith, Belgium 17-23 Dec. 1944
    Vielsalm

    7th Armored Division tank on northeast side of town, along road to St. Vith (erected thanks to Maurice Delaval)
    Inscription on plaque reads:
    LE CHAR INVINCIBLE
    LE COURAGE INVINCIBLE
    The American 7th Armored Division and attached units headquartered in Vielsalm during the crucial period of the German Offensive of the Ardennes in 1944 held the important center of St. Vith preventing any advance and any exploitation on this main line, thus frustrating the German offensive by its sacrifice, permitting the launching of the Allied counter offensive.
    St. Vith, Belgium 17-23 Dec. 1944
    Vielsalm

    Bruce Clarke Square at main road junction in south part of town, just south of library
    Inscription on monument reads:
    A la 7 (US) Division Blindée du General Robert W. Hasbrouck
    Völkerich
    50.743828,5.977814 = 50°44'37.80"N 5°58'40.13"E

    (location not yet identified)
    Inscription on monument reads:
    Völkerich to the memory of its victims of the war 1940-1945
    WARTENBACH Marie died 11 Sep 1944
    HAGELSTEIN Alfred, political prisoner, died 2 May 1945
    Two U.S. GI's of the 7th Armored Division, died 18 Dec 1944

    Thus far the two GI's have not been identified.
    (photo thanks to Jacques de Coster of Maastricht, Netherlands)

    .
    .

    FRANCE
    Ballancourt-sur-Essonne
    48°32'7.75"N, 2°22'32.42"E

    Inscription reads:
    ICI LE 22 AOUT 1944
    Deux soldats américains
    sont tombés pour la libération de Ballancourt
    JOHN DELANEY
    MICHAEL DURDAN

    Both men were in the 440th Armored Field Artillery Battalion.
    NOTE however that the monument is in error, both about the date and place of their death.
    The men actually killed there were from Company C, 48th Armored Infantry Battalion:
    Pfc. John W. Singleton and Pvt. Salvatore Grifo
    Click here to see the accurate information about these men.


    (See also the temporary memorial to John Delaney, below.)

    (photo thanks to Al Wilderspin, nephew of John Delaney)
    Chartres

    Plaque at Station 6 of the Chemin de Memoire (Road of Memory), near the cathedral at the Esplanade de Resistance, adjacent to the Place du Chatelet
    (moved there in 2006 from behind the cathedral)
    Inscription reads:
    VIVE L'AMERIQUE-VIVE LA FRANCE-VIVE LA LIBERTE
    Chartres, France 16-18 Aug. 1944

    [The plaque in center is a copy of the commendatory letter from XX Corps.]
    .
    Courville-sur-Eure

    Bridge dedicated to 1st Lt. James O. Gomer
    (CO of Rcn/HQ/23) who died there 14 Aug 1944
  • plaque detail & dedication ceremony
  • combat death of Lt. Gomer

    (photo thanks to Frédéric Hallouin)

  • Dornot Bridgehead
    49° 2' 49.41" N 6° 3' 47.13" E (48.047059 N, 6.063091 E)

    Monument in Horseshoe Woods
    Inscription reads:
    WE WILL
    A LA MEMOIRE DES VAILLANTS SOLDATS AMERICAINS DE LA 5e DIVISION US QUI ONT DOULOUREUSMENT TRAVERSE LA MOSELLE A CET ENDROIT EN SEPTEMBRE 1944 POUR NOTRE LIBERTE

    (photo thanks to Carl Lucero, son of C/23 veteran Henry Lucero)

    Écharcon
    Dedicated 8 May 2013
    48°34'11.25"N, 2°24'42.41"E

    Plaque on wall on Rue de la Montagne, just north of Chemin de la Cave au Renard
    Inscription reads:
    Le 22 Août 1944
    Seconde Guerre Mondial (WWII)
    Libération de la Commune
    Ici sont tombés pour la France
    Le soldat Américain Pvt. Delbert J. Longworth
    et Robert Coudray d'Echarcon

    Click here to read more about the action in which he was killed.
    Click here to read about and see pictures of the ceremony.

    (photo thanks to Bertrand Pascal)
    La Ferté-Gaucher

    Inscription reads:
    Libération de La Ferté-Gaucher par les Troupes Américaines le 27 Août 1944 à 19H. 20
    Ici a été incendiée par un obus Allemand la 3ème voiture estafette.
    Cap. Chef THOMAS George / Américain
    Soldat LA CHANCE Ernest / Américain
    Soldat Inconnu / Américain
    Morts au Champ d'Honneur
    Soldat PRIOL Jean 18 Ans / Français Blessé

    [T/5 Thomas & Pvt. La Chance were D/87 Recon men. My research has found that the unknown man was probably Pvt. Stanley Zuber, also of D/87 who was killed the same day, apparently at Montry, France (see monument at Montry below), and that Pfc. Lester W. Tibbets, also of D/87, suffered broken ribs in this action but was not sent to the 59th Field Hospital until 2 days later (29 Aug 44).]
    (photo thanks to Ernie Gallet, AG/HQ/48 AIB)
    Marboué

    7th Armored Division monument, at the cemetery east of the road at the north end of town - with names of B/23 AIB men killed in ambushed column
    Inscription reads:
    7th Armored Division
    23rd Armored Infantry Battalion Co. B
    Pvt. Justine De Simone, Pfc. Joseph A. Guido, Pfc. Clyde H. Haney, S/Sgt. John J. Hobel, Pvt. Clinton W. Jenkins, Pvt. Louis R. A. Lemay, 2nd Lt. Robert T. Lemmon, Jr., Tec/5 Francis J. McCartney, Pfc. Nathan H. Sanford, Pfc. Jacob Stern, Pvt. Bennie L. Sutton

    NOTE: It has subsequently been learned that Joseph Guido was not killed at Marboué and in fact survived and was later injured in action on 21 Aug 44.

    Melun

    Avenue de la 7ème Division Blindée Américaine
    west from the Seine River, a few blocks south of the south bridge
    Montry

    At Place Stanley Zuber

    Inscription reads:
    A LA MEMOIRE DU SOLDAT AMERICAIN
    Tombé le 27 Août 1944
    Stanley ZUBER
    (photo thanks to Mairie of Montry website)
    Nangis
    48°33'28"N, 03°01'29"E

    Inscription reads:
    En Hommage aux deux soldats Américains de la 7e DB 23e Battalion d'Infanterie Blindée Morts le 26 Août 1944 lors de la Libération de Nangis.
    Staff Sergeant John L. Wood 22 ans
    Pvt. (Medic) William P. O' Rourke 20 ans
    En reconnaissance de leur sacrifice pour le peuple français et pour la Liberté
    (photo thanks to Daniel Blandin of the Souvenir Français Committee)

    John L. Wood (A/23) and William P. O'Rourke (Med/23) were not on the original plaque which recognized two unknown Americans. The Souvenir Français Committee placed a new plaque on the monument with the names of the two men. Click here to see the web page on the August 26, 2010 ceremonies.

    Rambouillet
    48°38'21.78"N, 1°49'5.00"E

    Eagle Monument, by the Château on road D-906 (Avenue du Maréchal Leclerc) out west side of town, towards Epernon
    Inscription reads:
    A la mémoire des soldats américains tombés pour la libération de notre région en août 1944
    Inscription on rightmost plaque:
    7th Armored Division
    2nd Lt. Charles E. Fairweather
    17th Tank Battalion
    K.I.A. 17th August 1944 Rambouillet
    Sillegny

    Dedicated September 19, 2009
    Inscription reads:
    A LA MEMOIRE DES AMERICAINS DE LA 7EME D. B.
    HEROS DE LA BATAILLE DE SILLEGNY 19-21 SEPT 1944
    WE REMEMBER YOU
    (photo thanks to Elisabeth & Alain Gozzo)
    Click here for the dedication ceremonies web page.
    Verdun

    Rue de la 7ème Division Blindée U.S.A.
    Libération de Verdun
    31 Août 1944
    (photo thanks to Ernie Gallet, AG/HQ/48 AIB)

    Click here for 7AD ceremony honoring French who saved the bridge.
    La Villette (Saint-Prest)
    48°28'45.90"N, 1°31'10.47"E

    Plaque with names of C/38 AIB men killed in the Liberation - in traffic circle (Rond-Point du 16 Août 1944) south of town on road heading toward Chartres
    Inscription reads:
    A la mémoire des Soldats Américains tués au combat le 16 août 1944 pour la libération de Saint-Prest
    7th Armored Division
    38th Armored Infantry Battalion Co. C
    Pvt. Gayther O. Adams, Pvt. Harry H. Retort, Tec/5 Andrew J. Slavik, Pfc. Edward A. Swanson
    Killed in action

    HOLLAND / NETHERLANDS
    Meijel
    51°20'41.30"N, 5°52'58.32"E

    Inscription reads:
    27th-30th October 1944
    IN MEMORY
    of the soldiers of the US 7th Armored Division who gave their lives during the battle near Meijel against a German superior force.

    Click here for a web page about the monument and the dedication.

    (photo thanks to Werner van Osch)

    Ospel
    51°18'22.60"N, 5°48'10.00"E


    Inscription reads:
    OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 1944
    IN MEMORY
    of the soldiers of the US 7th Armored Division who gave their lives during the liberation of Ospel

    A separate web page is necessary to describe it and to list the names.
    Click here to go to that web page.

    (photo thanks to Niek Hendrix of Ospel, Netherlands)

    Overloon

    dedicated September 27, 2008
    Liberty Park, next to War Museum
    Inscription reads:
    OCTOBER 1944
    IN MEMORY
    of the soldiers of the US 7th Armored Division who gave their lives during the liberation of Overloon

    Click here for a web page about the monument and the dedication.
    Click here for names of the American dead from the Battle of Overloon.

    (photo thanks to Kees Stravers)

    Overloon

    Dedicated October 8, 2011
    Liberty Park, next to War Museum
    The tank was excellently restored over the course of 2 years from a rusted wheel-less shell of a tank the Dutch Army had received from the US Army.
    The tank was restored to the same markings as the A/40 tank "Able Abe" in which T/4 Allan Persons was killed 1 Oct 1944 just west of Overloon.
    (photo thanks to Niek Hendrix of Ospel, Netherlands)
    Click here for names of the American dead from the Battle of Overloon.
    Overloon

    Gen. Hasbroucklaan (General Hasbrouck Lane)
    near the Overloon War Museum
    (photo thanks to the Henckens family of Overloon and Niek Hendrix of Ospel, Netherlands)
    Click here for names of the American dead from the Battle of Overloon.
    Overloon (west)
    51°33'49.69"N, 5°55'14.48"E

    Inscription reads:
    Op deze plek werden in februari 1977 de lichamen
    gevonden van 2 Amerikaanse soldaten van het
    48th inf bn 7th armored division.
    George J. Renda
    Aloysius Gonsowski
    Beiden gesneuveld op 5 oktober 1944
    Translation: On this spot, in February 1977, the remains of 2 American soldiers were discovered from the 48th inf bn 7th armored division - both killed 5 October 1944.

    Take Oploseweg west out of Overloon. Turn left at Crooijmansweg and then a quick left at Kamphoefweg (first 200 meters is dirt road). The monument is at the next road junction (Roosendaalseweg) south of Vredepeelweg.

    Click here for a web page about the monument and the dedication.
    Click here for names of the American dead from the Battle of Overloon.

    (photo thanks to Sieb Wilmsen, who found the remains of the two men)

    Ransdaal


    Inscription reads:
    In memory of Richard Allan Knott also known by his friends as "Tennessee Knott" who was killed in a tragic accident with a firearm here in Ransdaal at the house of the Brull family across the street.
    Let us never forget that he also lost his life during our liberation.

    Click here for a web page about the dedication.

    (photo thanks to Niek Hendrix of Ospel, Netherlands)

    UNITED STATES
    California
    Camp Coxcomb


    Multi-unit Plaque at the Desert Training Center
    (7th Armored Division Patch at Upper Right)
    Click here for full text and for information on finding the monument.
    (photo thanks to artwilson@earthlink.net)
    Georgia
    Fort Benning


    7th Armored Division Monument
    (photo thanks to Niek Hendrix of Ospel, Netherlands)
    Kentucky
    Fort Knox


    7th Armored Division Monument and individual unit monuments, just left of the path as you come south from the parking lot to the Patton Museum
    Kentucky
    Fort Knox


    -- NO PHOTO YET --

    Housing complex named for Medal of Honor winner Robert Dietz (Company "A", 38th Armored Infantry Battalion)

    This housing complex was torn down, rebuilt, and renamed, since new Fort Knox housing areas are no longer named after heroes.

    Kentucky
    Fort Knox




    St. Vith MPTR (Multi-purpose Training) Complex

    The original St. Vith Training Range was remodeled in 1996, making it much larger.
    (photo thanks to Arlin Kramer, 2008 Range manager of the St. Vith MPTR)

    Louisiana
    Fort Polk


    7th Armored Division Monument
    The Division was activated at Ft. Polk on 1 March 1942
    (photo thanks to Ray Duke 77th Med Bn)
    Minnesota
    Appleton


    Paul Street

    In 1947, Appleton, MN named their streets after the men of the city who had died in WWII. Paul Street is named for T/4 Norbert W. Paul of 814th Tank Destroyer Battalion, who was killed 23 November 1944.
    (information thanks to Jan Bardoul of Heerlen, Netherlands, volunteer caretaker for Norbert Paul's grave at the Netherlands US Military at Margraten; street sign photo thanks to Lizabeth Gades of City of Appleton)

    Missouri
    Fort Leonard Wood


    St. Vith Training Area
    The 48th Armored Infantry Regiment, parent of 23 AIB, 38 AIB, and 48 AIB, was reactivated as the 48th Infantry Regiment in 1989 and the 1st Battalion is now at Ft. Leonard Wood.
    (photo thanks to Wesley Crawford, son of Paul Crawford of 1/A/23)
    New York
    Kingston




    Dietz Memorial Stadium
    Named for Medal of Honor winner Robert Dietz (Company "A", 38th Armored Infantry Battalion)
    (photos thanks to Peter Gorman of 2/2/A/38, who was Dietz's first squad leader)
    And remember the US National World War II Memorial


    TEMPORARY MARKERS
    These temporary memorials were set up after the war, at places where the U. S. Army remained. The temporary monuments were usually parade grounds or recreational fields, named for men who had died in the war. These temporary monuments are really hard to nail down now. So if you have any information on any temporary monuments, please contact me (see bottom of this web page for contact information link).
    FRANCE
    Ballancourt




    Pvt. John F. Delaney Field

    Pvt. John Delaney of the 440th Armored Field Artillery Battalion was killed 23 August 1944 by counter-battery artillery fire just west of Farcy (by Dammarie-les-Lys SW of Melun), which is about 12 miles from Ballancourt. (see the Ballancourt monument above). This baseball field of the 106th Reinforcment Battalion was dedicated to his memory.

    Inscription on Sign over Entrance:
    In loving and grateful memory of Pvt. John F. Delaney U.S. Army 7th Armored Division
    He gave his life. He gave his soul. Be blest that freedom loving people may rest.
    To him we dedicate this field. For liberty and freedom he was our shield.

    (Photo taken August 11, 1945 By Albert Fisher; supplied by Al Wilderspin, nephew of John Delaney)
    GERMANY
    Gadebusch




    Company "B"
    31st Tank Battalion


    IN MEMORY OF OUR GALLANT BUDDIES WHO GAVE THEIR LIFE FOR THEIR COUNTRY
    Lt. Robert L. Casey - Lt. Henry T. Hahn
    S/Sgt. Johnnie A. Meade - S/Sgt. Jack O. Nye
    Sgt. Daniel G. Wood - Sgt. Harmon T. Jess
    Tec. 4 George Hawkins - Cpl. Theodore Majka
    Pfc. Lawton T. Gay - Pfc. Fred H. Bradburn
    Pfc. Andrew J. Krisak - Pfc. Nickles Steinlander Jr.
    Pvt. Thurman Meeks - Pvt. Bert La Combe
    Pvt. Frank Barley

    (1945 photo owned by Marx Bledsoe, B/31; provided by his daughter Elaine Wischnowsky)
    GERMANY
    Osterburken


    -- NO PHOTO YET --

    2nd Lt. James E. Newberry, Jr. Parade Ground

    Lt. Newberry, a member of the 48th Armored Infantry Battalion appears to have been the first combat death in the 7th Armored Division. He was killed when his jeep was hit by a screeming mimi (nebelwerfer) at Senonches, France, probably on August 14, 1944.

    (Thanks to Sam Sharp, CO/AG/HQ/48, for this information.)

    Online Memorials and Monuments
    The following are online web sites that are memorials to 7th Armored Division or 7th Armored Division men.

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    MUSEUMS WITH SIGNIFICANT EXHIBITS ON OR RELEVANCE TO THE 7TH ARMORED DIVISION:
    • World War II Era 7th Armored Division
      • Belgium
      • France
        • Fleville, France
      • Netherlands
        • Overloon: Liberty Park: (formerly the National War and Resistance Museum (Nationaal Oorlogs- en Verzetsmuseum)) many vehicles, no longer including a 31st Tank Battalion tank (nicknamed "Cookie")
      • U. S. A.
        • Camp Polk, LA
    • Korean War Era 7th Armored Division
    Please let me know of any others that meet the criteria of having significant exhibits about 7th Armored Division.


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